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The DAISY Project

Improving the identification of Dysphagia following Acute cervIcal Spinal cord injurY


The DAISY project is funded by the National Institute of Health Research as part of a doctoral research fellowship awarded to Jackie McRae.

It is supported by University College London and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore. 


"Eating and drinking made things a little more normal again...."


For many people with a cervical spinal cord injury, eating and drinking safely is an added challenge to their recovery. 

The DAISY Project aims to improve the early management of swallowing problems, by identifying the key risk factors and developing a screening tool for staff, so that people can safely return to the pleasures of eating and drinking again.

This short video tells you more from the people who have had the experience themselves.
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DAISY project newsletters:

ppi2newsletterapril2016.pdf
April 2016 newsletter - the DAISY project so far..
researchafternoonflyermay15.pdf
Research Information afternoon - May 2015

The project in 3 phases:

Survey of ICU staff

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Part 1 of the study is completion of a survey about current clinical practice by doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, speech and language therapists and dietitians in dealing with swallowing, feeding, breathing and mouthcare for patients after a cervical spinal cord injury. THIS IS NOW CLOSED

Patient voice

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RECRUITMENT COMPLETE. In part 2, people will be interviewed about their experiences of having a cervical spinal cord injury and the management of any swallowing or feeding problems whilst in intensive care. This will provide a unique insight into patients experiences.

The DELPHI study - thanks to www.dpru.org

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DELPHI PROCESS COMPLETED. In the third part of the study, an international panel of clinical experts will be invited to rate a series of statements about how to manage swallowing problems. This information will be developed into a swallow screening tool and clinical practice recommmendations.

A pilot of the tool will assess validity.